Be yourself; everyone else is already taken
Be yourself; everyone else is already taken
+
floateron:

frozenfontana:

iaintnopapaya:

Disney Princesses as sloths.

but why

why not
floateron:

frozenfontana:

iaintnopapaya:

Disney Princesses as sloths.

but why

why not
floateron:

frozenfontana:

iaintnopapaya:

Disney Princesses as sloths.

but why

why not
floateron:

frozenfontana:

iaintnopapaya:

Disney Princesses as sloths.

but why

why not
floateron:

frozenfontana:

iaintnopapaya:

Disney Princesses as sloths.

but why

why not
floateron:

frozenfontana:

iaintnopapaya:

Disney Princesses as sloths.

but why

why not
floateron:

frozenfontana:

iaintnopapaya:

Disney Princesses as sloths.

but why

why not
+
+
tastefullyoffensive:

"I paused ‘Orange is the New Black’ at the reich time." -jmbradley
+
+
menthuthuyoupi:

YO YOU NOT GON HELP???
+
cross-connect:

Glass sculptures by Sydney-based artist Ben Young
“I work with 2D shapes and have to figure out how to translate that into a 3D finished product. Sometimes my start point changes dramatically as shapes can be limited – I can’t create any internal right angles – so I have to find a way to layer the glass to create certain shapes.” (text from brokenliquid.com)
Behance
Posted to Cross Connect by Miyuki
cross-connect:

Glass sculptures by Sydney-based artist Ben Young
“I work with 2D shapes and have to figure out how to translate that into a 3D finished product. Sometimes my start point changes dramatically as shapes can be limited – I can’t create any internal right angles – so I have to find a way to layer the glass to create certain shapes.” (text from brokenliquid.com)
Behance
Posted to Cross Connect by Miyuki
cross-connect:

Glass sculptures by Sydney-based artist Ben Young
“I work with 2D shapes and have to figure out how to translate that into a 3D finished product. Sometimes my start point changes dramatically as shapes can be limited – I can’t create any internal right angles – so I have to find a way to layer the glass to create certain shapes.” (text from brokenliquid.com)
Behance
Posted to Cross Connect by Miyuki
cross-connect:

Glass sculptures by Sydney-based artist Ben Young
“I work with 2D shapes and have to figure out how to translate that into a 3D finished product. Sometimes my start point changes dramatically as shapes can be limited – I can’t create any internal right angles – so I have to find a way to layer the glass to create certain shapes.” (text from brokenliquid.com)
Behance
Posted to Cross Connect by Miyuki
cross-connect:

Glass sculptures by Sydney-based artist Ben Young
“I work with 2D shapes and have to figure out how to translate that into a 3D finished product. Sometimes my start point changes dramatically as shapes can be limited – I can’t create any internal right angles – so I have to find a way to layer the glass to create certain shapes.” (text from brokenliquid.com)
Behance
Posted to Cross Connect by Miyuki
cross-connect:

Glass sculptures by Sydney-based artist Ben Young
“I work with 2D shapes and have to figure out how to translate that into a 3D finished product. Sometimes my start point changes dramatically as shapes can be limited – I can’t create any internal right angles – so I have to find a way to layer the glass to create certain shapes.” (text from brokenliquid.com)
Behance
Posted to Cross Connect by Miyuki
cross-connect:

Glass sculptures by Sydney-based artist Ben Young
“I work with 2D shapes and have to figure out how to translate that into a 3D finished product. Sometimes my start point changes dramatically as shapes can be limited – I can’t create any internal right angles – so I have to find a way to layer the glass to create certain shapes.” (text from brokenliquid.com)
Behance
Posted to Cross Connect by Miyuki
cross-connect:

Glass sculptures by Sydney-based artist Ben Young
“I work with 2D shapes and have to figure out how to translate that into a 3D finished product. Sometimes my start point changes dramatically as shapes can be limited – I can’t create any internal right angles – so I have to find a way to layer the glass to create certain shapes.” (text from brokenliquid.com)
Behance
Posted to Cross Connect by Miyuki
+
gojira-senpai:

jkerving23:

gojira-senpai:

fluffyrabidkitten:

wingedwolf94:

mastermindofinsanity:

black-nails-and-t-cells:

eridick-amporna:

icantbelieveitsnot-better:

#Jack was actually the Professor’s ancestor #but after being sent to the future the Professor was then never born #therefore never made the Powerpuff girls #and the forces of evil were free to destroy the world

oh shit son.

My mouth just dropped

oh damn

Oh…



Besides the fact Chemical X is blood of Aku.

No, Chemical X is actually his own blood with a hint of Aku’s blood when Jack was infected 

!!! Oh! Still though, more continuity!
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+
+
cross-connect:

The Father of ‘Lowbrow’ and Pop-Surrealism Robert Williams
Robert Williams (born March 2, 1943) is an American painter, cartoonist, and founder of Juxtapoz Art & Culture Magazine.
Williams was one of the group of artists who produced Zap Comix,[1] along with other underground cartoonists, such as Robert Crumb, S. Clay Wilson, and Gilbert Shelton. His mix of California car culture, cinematic apocalypticism, and film noir helped to create a new genre of psychedelic imagery.
Known collectors of his art include Nicolas Cage, Leonardo DiCaprio, Artie Shaw, Debbie Harry, Anthony Kiedis, Von Dutch, Stanislav Szukalski, Ed Ruscha, and Timothy Leary.
Posted to Cross-Connect by Andrew
cross-connect:

The Father of ‘Lowbrow’ and Pop-Surrealism Robert Williams
Robert Williams (born March 2, 1943) is an American painter, cartoonist, and founder of Juxtapoz Art & Culture Magazine.
Williams was one of the group of artists who produced Zap Comix,[1] along with other underground cartoonists, such as Robert Crumb, S. Clay Wilson, and Gilbert Shelton. His mix of California car culture, cinematic apocalypticism, and film noir helped to create a new genre of psychedelic imagery.
Known collectors of his art include Nicolas Cage, Leonardo DiCaprio, Artie Shaw, Debbie Harry, Anthony Kiedis, Von Dutch, Stanislav Szukalski, Ed Ruscha, and Timothy Leary.
Posted to Cross-Connect by Andrew
cross-connect:

The Father of ‘Lowbrow’ and Pop-Surrealism Robert Williams
Robert Williams (born March 2, 1943) is an American painter, cartoonist, and founder of Juxtapoz Art & Culture Magazine.
Williams was one of the group of artists who produced Zap Comix,[1] along with other underground cartoonists, such as Robert Crumb, S. Clay Wilson, and Gilbert Shelton. His mix of California car culture, cinematic apocalypticism, and film noir helped to create a new genre of psychedelic imagery.
Known collectors of his art include Nicolas Cage, Leonardo DiCaprio, Artie Shaw, Debbie Harry, Anthony Kiedis, Von Dutch, Stanislav Szukalski, Ed Ruscha, and Timothy Leary.
Posted to Cross-Connect by Andrew
cross-connect:

The Father of ‘Lowbrow’ and Pop-Surrealism Robert Williams
Robert Williams (born March 2, 1943) is an American painter, cartoonist, and founder of Juxtapoz Art & Culture Magazine.
Williams was one of the group of artists who produced Zap Comix,[1] along with other underground cartoonists, such as Robert Crumb, S. Clay Wilson, and Gilbert Shelton. His mix of California car culture, cinematic apocalypticism, and film noir helped to create a new genre of psychedelic imagery.
Known collectors of his art include Nicolas Cage, Leonardo DiCaprio, Artie Shaw, Debbie Harry, Anthony Kiedis, Von Dutch, Stanislav Szukalski, Ed Ruscha, and Timothy Leary.
Posted to Cross-Connect by Andrew
cross-connect:

The Father of ‘Lowbrow’ and Pop-Surrealism Robert Williams
Robert Williams (born March 2, 1943) is an American painter, cartoonist, and founder of Juxtapoz Art & Culture Magazine.
Williams was one of the group of artists who produced Zap Comix,[1] along with other underground cartoonists, such as Robert Crumb, S. Clay Wilson, and Gilbert Shelton. His mix of California car culture, cinematic apocalypticism, and film noir helped to create a new genre of psychedelic imagery.
Known collectors of his art include Nicolas Cage, Leonardo DiCaprio, Artie Shaw, Debbie Harry, Anthony Kiedis, Von Dutch, Stanislav Szukalski, Ed Ruscha, and Timothy Leary.
Posted to Cross-Connect by Andrew
cross-connect:

The Father of ‘Lowbrow’ and Pop-Surrealism Robert Williams
Robert Williams (born March 2, 1943) is an American painter, cartoonist, and founder of Juxtapoz Art & Culture Magazine.
Williams was one of the group of artists who produced Zap Comix,[1] along with other underground cartoonists, such as Robert Crumb, S. Clay Wilson, and Gilbert Shelton. His mix of California car culture, cinematic apocalypticism, and film noir helped to create a new genre of psychedelic imagery.
Known collectors of his art include Nicolas Cage, Leonardo DiCaprio, Artie Shaw, Debbie Harry, Anthony Kiedis, Von Dutch, Stanislav Szukalski, Ed Ruscha, and Timothy Leary.
Posted to Cross-Connect by Andrew
cross-connect:

The Father of ‘Lowbrow’ and Pop-Surrealism Robert Williams
Robert Williams (born March 2, 1943) is an American painter, cartoonist, and founder of Juxtapoz Art & Culture Magazine.
Williams was one of the group of artists who produced Zap Comix,[1] along with other underground cartoonists, such as Robert Crumb, S. Clay Wilson, and Gilbert Shelton. His mix of California car culture, cinematic apocalypticism, and film noir helped to create a new genre of psychedelic imagery.
Known collectors of his art include Nicolas Cage, Leonardo DiCaprio, Artie Shaw, Debbie Harry, Anthony Kiedis, Von Dutch, Stanislav Szukalski, Ed Ruscha, and Timothy Leary.
Posted to Cross-Connect by Andrew
cross-connect:

The Father of ‘Lowbrow’ and Pop-Surrealism Robert Williams
Robert Williams (born March 2, 1943) is an American painter, cartoonist, and founder of Juxtapoz Art & Culture Magazine.
Williams was one of the group of artists who produced Zap Comix,[1] along with other underground cartoonists, such as Robert Crumb, S. Clay Wilson, and Gilbert Shelton. His mix of California car culture, cinematic apocalypticism, and film noir helped to create a new genre of psychedelic imagery.
Known collectors of his art include Nicolas Cage, Leonardo DiCaprio, Artie Shaw, Debbie Harry, Anthony Kiedis, Von Dutch, Stanislav Szukalski, Ed Ruscha, and Timothy Leary.
Posted to Cross-Connect by Andrew
cross-connect:

The Father of ‘Lowbrow’ and Pop-Surrealism Robert Williams
Robert Williams (born March 2, 1943) is an American painter, cartoonist, and founder of Juxtapoz Art & Culture Magazine.
Williams was one of the group of artists who produced Zap Comix,[1] along with other underground cartoonists, such as Robert Crumb, S. Clay Wilson, and Gilbert Shelton. His mix of California car culture, cinematic apocalypticism, and film noir helped to create a new genre of psychedelic imagery.
Known collectors of his art include Nicolas Cage, Leonardo DiCaprio, Artie Shaw, Debbie Harry, Anthony Kiedis, Von Dutch, Stanislav Szukalski, Ed Ruscha, and Timothy Leary.
Posted to Cross-Connect by Andrew
cross-connect:

The Father of ‘Lowbrow’ and Pop-Surrealism Robert Williams
Robert Williams (born March 2, 1943) is an American painter, cartoonist, and founder of Juxtapoz Art & Culture Magazine.
Williams was one of the group of artists who produced Zap Comix,[1] along with other underground cartoonists, such as Robert Crumb, S. Clay Wilson, and Gilbert Shelton. His mix of California car culture, cinematic apocalypticism, and film noir helped to create a new genre of psychedelic imagery.
Known collectors of his art include Nicolas Cage, Leonardo DiCaprio, Artie Shaw, Debbie Harry, Anthony Kiedis, Von Dutch, Stanislav Szukalski, Ed Ruscha, and Timothy Leary.
Posted to Cross-Connect by Andrew
+
+
catsbeaversandducks:

Comic by ©Happy Jar
+
steampunktendencies:

Miyazaki Steampunk Clock at NTV Shiodome, Tokyo.
This steampunk themed clock designed by the famous Hayao Miyazaki of Studio Ghibli is the largest animated clock in the world.  The clock was completed in December 2006 after a design period of over four years.
The enormous copper clock is 12 metres high, 18 metres wide, and has extensive animations timed to music including firing steam cannon, moving figures, and moving legs like Howl’s Moving Castle.
The clock was built by sculptor Shachimaru Kunio who also built the giant Laputa robot on the rooftop of the Ghibli museum.  Miyazaki said that he wanted to make something that would be loved by future generations that would last beyond his animated characters.
Video : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kThGigpvors

Credits : (Tokyo Excess) / (Photos : Ali Haikugirl)
Facebook |  Google + | Twitter
Steampunk Tendencies Official Group
steampunktendencies:

Miyazaki Steampunk Clock at NTV Shiodome, Tokyo.
This steampunk themed clock designed by the famous Hayao Miyazaki of Studio Ghibli is the largest animated clock in the world.  The clock was completed in December 2006 after a design period of over four years.
The enormous copper clock is 12 metres high, 18 metres wide, and has extensive animations timed to music including firing steam cannon, moving figures, and moving legs like Howl’s Moving Castle.
The clock was built by sculptor Shachimaru Kunio who also built the giant Laputa robot on the rooftop of the Ghibli museum.  Miyazaki said that he wanted to make something that would be loved by future generations that would last beyond his animated characters.
Video : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kThGigpvors

Credits : (Tokyo Excess) / (Photos : Ali Haikugirl)
Facebook |  Google + | Twitter
Steampunk Tendencies Official Group
steampunktendencies:

Miyazaki Steampunk Clock at NTV Shiodome, Tokyo.
This steampunk themed clock designed by the famous Hayao Miyazaki of Studio Ghibli is the largest animated clock in the world.  The clock was completed in December 2006 after a design period of over four years.
The enormous copper clock is 12 metres high, 18 metres wide, and has extensive animations timed to music including firing steam cannon, moving figures, and moving legs like Howl’s Moving Castle.
The clock was built by sculptor Shachimaru Kunio who also built the giant Laputa robot on the rooftop of the Ghibli museum.  Miyazaki said that he wanted to make something that would be loved by future generations that would last beyond his animated characters.
Video : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kThGigpvors

Credits : (Tokyo Excess) / (Photos : Ali Haikugirl)
Facebook |  Google + | Twitter
Steampunk Tendencies Official Group
steampunktendencies:

Miyazaki Steampunk Clock at NTV Shiodome, Tokyo.
This steampunk themed clock designed by the famous Hayao Miyazaki of Studio Ghibli is the largest animated clock in the world.  The clock was completed in December 2006 after a design period of over four years.
The enormous copper clock is 12 metres high, 18 metres wide, and has extensive animations timed to music including firing steam cannon, moving figures, and moving legs like Howl’s Moving Castle.
The clock was built by sculptor Shachimaru Kunio who also built the giant Laputa robot on the rooftop of the Ghibli museum.  Miyazaki said that he wanted to make something that would be loved by future generations that would last beyond his animated characters.
Video : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kThGigpvors

Credits : (Tokyo Excess) / (Photos : Ali Haikugirl)
Facebook |  Google + | Twitter
Steampunk Tendencies Official Group
steampunktendencies:

Miyazaki Steampunk Clock at NTV Shiodome, Tokyo.
This steampunk themed clock designed by the famous Hayao Miyazaki of Studio Ghibli is the largest animated clock in the world.  The clock was completed in December 2006 after a design period of over four years.
The enormous copper clock is 12 metres high, 18 metres wide, and has extensive animations timed to music including firing steam cannon, moving figures, and moving legs like Howl’s Moving Castle.
The clock was built by sculptor Shachimaru Kunio who also built the giant Laputa robot on the rooftop of the Ghibli museum.  Miyazaki said that he wanted to make something that would be loved by future generations that would last beyond his animated characters.
Video : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kThGigpvors

Credits : (Tokyo Excess) / (Photos : Ali Haikugirl)
Facebook |  Google + | Twitter
Steampunk Tendencies Official Group
steampunktendencies:

Miyazaki Steampunk Clock at NTV Shiodome, Tokyo.
This steampunk themed clock designed by the famous Hayao Miyazaki of Studio Ghibli is the largest animated clock in the world.  The clock was completed in December 2006 after a design period of over four years.
The enormous copper clock is 12 metres high, 18 metres wide, and has extensive animations timed to music including firing steam cannon, moving figures, and moving legs like Howl’s Moving Castle.
The clock was built by sculptor Shachimaru Kunio who also built the giant Laputa robot on the rooftop of the Ghibli museum.  Miyazaki said that he wanted to make something that would be loved by future generations that would last beyond his animated characters.
Video : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kThGigpvors

Credits : (Tokyo Excess) / (Photos : Ali Haikugirl)
Facebook |  Google + | Twitter
Steampunk Tendencies Official Group
steampunktendencies:

Miyazaki Steampunk Clock at NTV Shiodome, Tokyo.
This steampunk themed clock designed by the famous Hayao Miyazaki of Studio Ghibli is the largest animated clock in the world.  The clock was completed in December 2006 after a design period of over four years.
The enormous copper clock is 12 metres high, 18 metres wide, and has extensive animations timed to music including firing steam cannon, moving figures, and moving legs like Howl’s Moving Castle.
The clock was built by sculptor Shachimaru Kunio who also built the giant Laputa robot on the rooftop of the Ghibli museum.  Miyazaki said that he wanted to make something that would be loved by future generations that would last beyond his animated characters.
Video : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kThGigpvors

Credits : (Tokyo Excess) / (Photos : Ali Haikugirl)
Facebook |  Google + | Twitter
Steampunk Tendencies Official Group
steampunktendencies:

Miyazaki Steampunk Clock at NTV Shiodome, Tokyo.
This steampunk themed clock designed by the famous Hayao Miyazaki of Studio Ghibli is the largest animated clock in the world.  The clock was completed in December 2006 after a design period of over four years.
The enormous copper clock is 12 metres high, 18 metres wide, and has extensive animations timed to music including firing steam cannon, moving figures, and moving legs like Howl’s Moving Castle.
The clock was built by sculptor Shachimaru Kunio who also built the giant Laputa robot on the rooftop of the Ghibli museum.  Miyazaki said that he wanted to make something that would be loved by future generations that would last beyond his animated characters.
Video : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kThGigpvors

Credits : (Tokyo Excess) / (Photos : Ali Haikugirl)
Facebook |  Google + | Twitter
Steampunk Tendencies Official Group
+
+
perks-of-being-sian:

this is the best thing since sliced bread I’m not kidding
perks-of-being-sian:

this is the best thing since sliced bread I’m not kidding
perks-of-being-sian:

this is the best thing since sliced bread I’m not kidding
perks-of-being-sian:

this is the best thing since sliced bread I’m not kidding
perks-of-being-sian:

this is the best thing since sliced bread I’m not kidding
perks-of-being-sian:

this is the best thing since sliced bread I’m not kidding
perks-of-being-sian:

this is the best thing since sliced bread I’m not kidding
perks-of-being-sian:

this is the best thing since sliced bread I’m not kidding